Blog of Zoe at Galien Valley
Galien River valley, southwest Michigan, North America

Homepage for

Nice5, Holistic, CEEE:
5 ways to be Nice,
Holistic, and
Culture-Education-Ecology-Economy

 

 

 

5 Ways to be Nice (Nice5)

1. Friendly to People / Daily Personal Behavior / Directly Nice
2. Unprejudiced / Directly Nice
3. Friendly to Nature / Directly Nice
4. Help Individuals in Occasional Emergencies / Help Individuals (people, animals, plants, etc.) / Directly Nice
5. Daily Community Help / Help Communities / Holistic Help / Indirectly Nice

There are many ways to be nice, but I think these 5 are the most significant ways to detect if someone is truly nice.  To be truly nice is to be holistically nice: nice in all 5 of these ways, and not just polite.

1. Friendly to People / Daily Personal Behavior / Directly Nice: acting friendly, polite, peaceful, joyful, thankful, loving, caring towards family, friends, co-workers, and community members.  Do not be abusive, violent, harmful, aggressive, bossy towards people.  Do not put people down and call people names.

2. Unprejudiced / Directly Nice: friendly to everyone: friendly to everyone no matter gender, race, family, nationality, religion, ethnicity, profession, rich or poor, neighborhood of residence, sexual orientation, etc.

3. Friendly to Nature / Directly Nice: be aware of and pay attention to nature (local nature and global nature), go on nature walks, study nature, grow native plants, identify native birds, and more.

4. Help Individuals in Occasional Emergencies / Help Individuals (people, animals, plants, etc.) / Directly Nice: Directly help individuals who are Occasionally in Trouble. Help during dramatic acute disasters. Be a 1-day hero; or, repeatedly be a hero in only 1-way. Save a life or lives. Give to Charities.  Donate Money.  Donate Time.  Literally or figuratively, helping to lift someone up on the rare occasion that they fall down. Random acts of kindness. Good Samaritan. Policeman. Fireman. Ambulance. Insurance Agency. Life Guard. Search and Rescue. Save one species of animal. Save your pet.

5. Daily Community Help / Help Communities / Holistic Help / Indirectly Nice: Daily Live a Moral Culture, a Community Culture. See definition of community. Daily uphold or to try to establish a nice moral sustainable community culture that holistically helps communities to flourish. The most important way that people can be nice is to daily live a nice, moral, sustainable, local culture. Daily, live, learn, work, play, socialize, do science, do art, produce, and consume in ways that sustain and enrich morals, altruistic individual people, nature, families and friendships, communities, and people getting enough vital basic stuff (shelter, water, warmth, food, clothes, and basic tools).  Be a daily holistic hero who supports peoples' health and quality-of-life in many ways: supports clean air to breath, supports clean water to drink, supports a diversity of nutritious local organic food to eat, and supports a community culture, education, economy, science, and art that sustains and enriches communities, people, and nature. Daily, live a way of life, live a culture, that holistically helps communities, people, nature, community landscapes, community economies, community cooperation, and personal self-sufficiency. Part of being nice to communities and being holistically helpful is to live, learn, and work to support good things (safety, health, supply (economy), wisdom, sustainability, peace, harmony, community love, deep joy, etc.) while simultaneously preventing, diminishing, or overcoming the many interconnected local and global on-going problems (poverty, war, depression, pollution, wilderness loss, severe climate change, etc.). A culture (the way we live, learn, and work) has an indirect effect on communities, people, and nature. A culture (the way we live, learn, and work) is indirectly helpful (nice) or harmful (not-nice) to communities, people, and nature. Thus, let us daily live a nice culture that has a holistically good and nice indirect effect on communities, people, and nature. Furthermore, a culture (the way we live, learn, and work) 1. helps communities to flourish in sustainable local-self-sufficiency, or 2. harms communities by letting communities be unsustainable and helplessly dependent on centralized governments and or large globalized corporations, which take empowerment, wealth, and well-being away from communities. Thus, let us daily live a nice, moral, sustainable, community culture that helps communities to flourish in local-self-sufficiency. People, who can walk and talk for themselves, are better at interacting with the world. Likewise, communities, which run their own locally-self-sufficient community economies for themselves, are better at interacting with the world. Daily, live in holistic ways (see below about "Holistic") that establish or uphold a holistic community culture-education-ecology-economy. (See below about "Culture-Education-Ecology-Economy"). The most important way that people can be nice is to daily live a nice moral sustainable local culture.
Long-term, on-going, daily help during dramatic and subtle chronic disasters. While poverty, starvation, war, pollution, and severe climate change still exist (and even while they don't) we need to consistently be living, learning, and working in ways that holistically support communities, people, and nature, and simultaneously help to prevent, diminish, or overcome poverty, starvation, war, pollution, severe climate change, and other chronic disasters. The most important way that people can be nice is to daily live a nice moral sustainable local culture.
Also see the definition of "nice" in the definitionz page.

Being nice in the first 4 ways focuses on being nice directly to individuals (individual people, animals, plants, etc.). Being Nice in the 5th way focuses on being nice to whole communities. Yet, the well-being of communities affects the well-being and quality of life of individual people. Being nice in only the first 4 ways is not nice enough, because if communities are harmed, people are harmed too. To truly be nice is to be nice in all 5 ways, because being nice to the whole community affects individual people in a nice way too.

How nice was Christopher Columbus? Columbus conquered Hispaniola (modern-day Haiti and Dominican Republic) for Spain and brought Catholic Europeans to settle in Hispaniola. It was a custom for Catholics to be friendly to fellow Catholics and to scorn the heathens (the natives of Hispaniola). While Columbus was living in Hispaniola, a Catholic clergyman complained to Columbus that Columbus was being equally friendly to Catholics and the heathens (Native Americans). Columbus was nice in 2 or 3 ways: 1. he was friendly to his sailing crew members, 2. he was even unprejudiced and directly friendly to each individual Native American, that he met, and 3. he even likely lent a helping hand during occasional acute emergencies on ships at sea, over his lifetime. Although Columbus was nice in 2 or 3 ways, Columbus was overall vicious, because he did the most cruel thing: he was not nice in the 5th and most important way to be nice: to uphold or to try to establish a nice moral sustainable community culture that holistically helps communities to flourish in sustainable local-self-sufficiency. Although Columbus was directly friendly and polite to individual natives, Columbus ruthlessly destroyed the natives' communities and the natives' flourishing local-self-sufficient community economy. Columbus established a distant centralized government (Spain) to have power over the natives' communities and to steal the wealth (the gold, etc.) from natives' communities and send the wealth away to distant Spain. Columbus supported capitalism: community wealth being stolen and ravaged by the global market. Also, Columbus brought other atrocities to the communities, people, and nature of Hispaniola.

How nice are people today? Are people being nice in all 5 ways, or only in some of the 5 ways? Are people being nice in the 5th way: upholding or trying to establish a nice moral sustainable community culture that holistically helps communities to flourish in sustainable local-self-sufficiency? Or, are people especially cruel today, because people have let capitalist coercion and globalized large corporations ruin community cooperation, community education, community economies, and local-self-sufficiency? I think most modern people don't want to be cruel. If we are cruel, it's because we were raised to be cruel: to live the culture of capitalism (the capitalism culture-education-ecology-economy), which neglects communities and supports globalized large corporations and profit-worship. We need to make a concerted effort to change our culture from the destructive cruel capitalism culture to a nice moral sustainable community culture (a community culture-education-ecology-economy) that helps communities to regain holistic goodness and functional locally-self-sufficient community cultures, educations, and economies. I practice holistic skills to support community cultures and to be nice in all 5 ways.

Also see and education that is Nice in All 5 Ways: The Changes Needed in Education and the Economy: 7 Goals and Success Indicators of culture, education, ecology, and economy.

See "holistic" immediately below. See "culture-education-ecology-economy" farther down below. See bottom to see examples of the nicest societies, holistic societies, and community culture-education-ecology-economies.

 

 

 

Holistic

I use the word "holistic"
not to narrowly mean herbal medicines alone,
but yes to broadly mean whole culture, including economy, education, science, art, the way we live, learn, work, etc.

"Holistic" means everything basic that people and communities need: food, water, shelter, nature and science, art and community, economy and ecology, community and culture, love, joy, peace, and
overall health (moral, mental, physical, social, environmental).

"Holistic" means that each skill, task, and activity is beneficial in multiple ways, and not in just one way. Holistic means that it's simultaneously beneficial in many ways including to people's health, safety, culture, education, economy, science, art, love, peace, joy, and more.   An example skill, task, or activity that is not holistic is beneficial in only one or a few ways, such as only making short-term money, and meanwhile ruining people's safety, health, long-term economy, education, skillfulness, peace, harmony, fun, and the health of nature.

"Holistic" means that it not only promotes good things: people's safety, health, supply (economy), wisdom, awareness, peace, harmony, love, joy, fun, and more, but also, it concurrently prevents and diminishes local and global interconnected problems: poverty, war, depression, loneliness, isolation, drug abuse, pollution, wilderness loss, severe climate change, and more.

"Holistic" means that it supports a nice moral "community culture-education-ecology-economy:" a.k.a. "community culture." See below, which describes culture-education-ecology-economy. Holistic means that it's nice in all 5 ways. To be holistic is to be holistically nice, including to be directly friendly to individual people, being unprejudiced, and living a culture, learning, and working in ways that are holistically sustainable and nice to communities, people, and nature. See above, which describes 5 Ways to Be Nice.

Read about Holistic, Holistic Skills,
Holistic Health, Holistic Community Culture,
Holistic Landcare, Holistic Science and Art,
Holistic Education, and Holistic Economy
,
and Holistic Days.

See definition of community.

See Holistic Days for photos of holistic and sustainable activities.

See Zoe's Daily Blog for photos of holistic and sustainable activities in nature classes and see photos of Michigan nature.

See Galien Valley Nature and Culture Program for photos of holistic and sustainable activities in nature classes.

 

 

 

Culture-Education-Ecology-Economy
(CEEE)

Culture, education, ecology, and economy are all connected and affect each other. We cannot change one without changing all of them. We cannot have sustainable communities that flourish with locally-self-sufficient economies, unless our culture, education, and ecological emphasis influences people to be community-well-being oriented, instead of global-market-profit oriented.

Culture, education, ecology (including how humans interact with nature and steward nature), and economy are strongly linked together and influence each other. We cannot change one alone; therefore, we have to change all of them together. A culture includes values such as what is valued in each field: education, ecology, and economy. We have to change our cultural values of education values, ecologic values, and economic values together, not separately. Also, we have to change our cultural, educational, ecologic, and economic main goals and success indicators. Furthermore, our main goals and success indicators have to be exactly the same in our culture, education, ecology, and economy. If they are not the same, they all hinder each other from reaching their different goals. The only way to sustain and enrich communities, people, and nature is if our culture, education, ecology, and economy have the same sustainable goals and success indicators. See the Changes Needed in Education and Economy: 7 Goals and Success Indicators of culture, education, ecology, and economy, in order to help communities, people, and nature.

See definition of community.

A community culture is good. A community culture (a community culture-education-ecology-economy) is based on morals, moral love (community-love, brotherly-love, a love to help all mankind), awareness, altruism, holistic good, and helping people and nature thrive together. There was, is, and will be no such thing as a perfect human society, but a society of communities based on morals, love, awareness, altruism, holistic good, and helping people and nature thrive together is the best kind of human society there is. The bottom section, on this page, gives examples of nice, holistic, community cultures.

Modern culture is immoral (bad, terrible, heinous): it increases many problems including social and economic inequality and injustice, poverty, the daily grind, hectic schedules, depression, drug abuse, mindlessness, disconnection from reality, fake news, loneliness, helplessness, bad education, superficial success, extravagant consumption, greed, bullying, racism, extreme resource wars, extreme weapons, pollution, wilderness loss, severe climate change, polytheism (including the worship of many gods: celebrities, sports, technology, test scores, college degrees, shopping, perfect lawns), etc. Modern immoral culture is madness; thus, I refer to modern culture as cultural madness. Also, modern immoral cultural madness can also be called capitalism (global market, global destruction). The capitalism culture is the one global disaster with many interconnected bad side-effects: chronic global problems: social and economic inequality and injustice, poverty, the daily grind, hectic schedules, depression, resources wars, wilderness loss, severe climate change, other problems mentioned above, and more. Some of these problems existed before capitalism.  Capitalism created new problems plus caused old ones to worsen.

The Age of Capitalism and Industry. Capitalism is the global market, such as Europe's market expanding beyond Europe to throughout the rest of the world. European Medieval Feudalism exhausted European soils and wealth; following, capitalism started: the European market started seeking global new frontiers (new communities) from which to exhaust their soils and extract their wealth. The Age of Capitalism and Industry started over 500 years ago, in the 1460s, on the Island of Madeira, just off the coast of Africa. (See book on the history of capitalism: The History of the World in Seven Cheap Things, by Jason Moore and Raj Patel, 2017.) The Age of Capitalism and Industry began with a bank of Genoa (in modern-day Italy) financing the Portuguese to start a sugarcane globalized industry, plantations, and slavery, on the Island of Madeira. The Madeira sugarcane factory had all the essential components of a modern factory. The Madeira sugarcane industry is Europe's first capitalist globalized industry business. Furthermore, the Portuguese had African slaves work at the Madeira sugarcane plantation and factory. Europe's first black slavery (outside of Europe and Africa) was on the Island of Madeira. After Madeira soils were exhausted, Europe expanded its slave trade and sugarcane industry into North and South America. Following the financing of the Island of Madeira sugar industry, the bank of Genoa also financed Columbus' conquest of Hispaniola (modern-day Haiti and Dominican Republic). Spain was bankrupted from war; hence, Spain had to borrow money from a bank to finance Columbus. Who profited the most from Europe's world conquest: the Pope, the kings and queens of Europe, Columbus and other explorers, the poor people of Europe, the Native Americans, or the African slaves? None of the above, it was the banks: Europe's globalized large corporations of finance. During the age of the Catholic Empire and European Feudalism, the Catholic Church, kings, and queens had the most money. During the Age of Capitalism and Industry, the largest banks have the most money. Today, the largest banks - the largest corporations of finance - have the most money. By exhausting soils, plus extracting power and wealth from communities to put lots of power and wealth into the hands of a few (such as within the largest financial corporations), as well as pressuring cultures, educations, economies, and people to not be nice in the 5th way, capitalism exasperates many chronic problems, worldwide.

Capitalism's bad side-effects of numerous problems are interconnected. We have to diminish all global chronic problems all together, because we cannot diminish any one global chronic problem alone. We diminish all global chronic problems (poverty, war, pollution, severe climate change, etc.) together by supporting community economies of holistic good and getting rid of capitalism (global market, global destruction). If we don't support community economies and get rid of capitalism, every problem will only get worse. Yes, individual people can be saved from particular problems, but, in general, the problems will increase worldwide. Most existing charities save only individual people or families from a particular global problem. Most existing charities do not diminish any global chronic problem itself. Technology alone will not diminish any chronic global problem either. Technology and money together alone will not diminish any chronic global problem either. The only thing that will diminish any of the current chronic global problems is to support community culture-education-ecology-economy and get rid of the capitalism culture-education-ecology-economy (global market, global destruction). Technology, money, charities, churches, and benevolent federal and state governments can be of useful supplemental help with supporting community culture-education-ecology-economy flourishing local self-sufficiency, but global and local chronic problems will not diminish until there is a strong support of communities along with a strong forgoing of capitalism. Not only can we live without capitalism, the only way to continue to live is to get rid of capitalism, to establish community economies, and to be moral, loving, aware, altruistic, and holistically-good.

Capitalism is an extremist globalized form of greed and making a few people rich and many people poor. Capitalism is insanity. Capitalism is the unscientific and incorrect crazy belief that the planet is ever increasing in diameter and surface area or is an infinite size. Capitalism requires corporations to infinitely expand its business across the land and oceans, which doesn't work on the finite planet of Earth.

Capitalism is an economy, but establishes a certain type of culture and education and ecology (including how humans treat nature) that goes with it; thus, capitalism is not just an economy, but it is a culture-education-ecology-economy. In capitalism, the globalized pop culture, globalized mass media, and mass pop education influence people to live, learn, and work in ways that promote the capitalist (globalized market) economy. Although some people do benefit from capitalism, it is globalized corporate monopolies (financial industries, fossil fuel industries, clothing industries, industrial agriculture, pharmaceutical industries, etc.) that benefit the most from capitalism. While capitalism seems to do some short-term good, capitalism is overall harmful to communities, people, and nature, especially in the long-run. Capitalism is a "free"-market that has been let free to ravage and ruin many communities, people, and nature. Capitalism's bad side-effects (of social and economic injustice, severe climate change, etc.) increasingly ruin communities, people, and nature. We need to get rid of capitalism and establish a better economy: a "community economy," which is a more fair and just economy that is more ecologically conscious and more evenly distributes wealth throughout communities and people, worldwide. If we want to get rid of the capitalism (global market) economy, we also have to get rid of 20th-century education (modern pop mass-education), which perpetuates capitalism; plus, we have to change our modern 20th-century culture (the pop modern way to live, learn, and work), which also perpetuates capitalism; and, we have to increasingly be more caring of ecology and the environment, which capitalism largely neglects. If we want to get rid of the capitalism (global market) economy, we have to set up community cultures, community educations, and an ecological emphasis that influence people and teach people to run nice (in all 5 ways), moral, holistically-good, sustainable, locally-self-sufficient community economies, in which most (if not all) people flourish. Human societies of community culture-education-ecology-economy can be much better than capitalism.

There is no such thing as a perfect mortal human society, but the capitalist society is so far the worst. Yes, capitalism has the most amazing glitz, glamour, and gadgets ever, but, under its shiny thin veneer, it's ugly. Modern society is the most ruthless society ever, because it has a ruthless culture, a ruthless education system, a negligent ecological emphasis, and a ruthless economy. Capitalism's culture (as well as its education, ecology, and economy) sways people to not be nice in the 5th way (see top of web page).   The USA's civil laws may allow all genders and races to vote and to attend school together, but the USA is one of the most ruthless and unfair nations ever, because it follows a ruthless culture-education-ecology-economy, which sways people to support capitalism and to not be nice in the 5th way.   Martin Luther King Jr. knew that two things had to happen to support social and economic justice for all races: 1. change civil laws to establish racial desegregation, and 2. get rid of capitalism and its destructive culture-education-ecology-economy.  Because capitalism still exists and only the civil laws changed, today, people of all races increasingly suffer social and economic injustice.  Changing civil laws alone is not good enough.   What is also required is replacing the capitalism culture-education-ecology-economy with a nice (in all 5 ways), moral, holistically-good, holistically-sustainable, community culture-education-ecology-economy.

A community culture-education-ecology-economy includes community education. School subjects are interconnected in a community education. Community school students learn that every subject is linked together. School subject lessons and assignments are often done in unison in one classroom (in an indoor-outdoor classroom, or an outdoor classroom).  In community education, students learn how to establish and uphold a community culture, a community education, landcare strategies (ecology), community government, and community economy that holistically helps, sustains, and enriches communities, people, and nature.  In a community education, students do science that relates to art, culture, local ecology, global environment, community economy, and other subjects.  In a community education, students study a few or several cultures and learn that each of those cultures have children and adults get particular educations to learn to do science, art, and work at jobs that support a particular economy that care for, ignore, or abuse nature.  In community education, ecology is not just how plants and animals beneficially interact with each other within habitats, but also ecology is learning how humans and community economies can interact with plant and animals within habitats to the benefit of both people and nature. In community education, students practice doing holistic skills (see above holistic and holistic skills). In community education, each community sets its own standards and standardized testing on knowledge and skills pertinent to the community's people, needs, health, economy, supplies, jobs, government, and nature. Community education promotes community socializing, friendship, and moral love. Community education teaches students to be nice in all 5 ways. Community education has students practice community cooperation to help people and nature, in the community and beyond. It's not a cut-throat competition to get into college, to make the most money, to do the most shopping, to support capitalism, to destroy life on this planet. Community education gets students hired into existing local small businesses or gets students to start their own local small businesses that help communities, people, and nature, and help to defeat capitalism (global market, global greed, global destruction). (Also see the educationz page.) Indeed, everything is connected: the way we do science and art and the way we live, learn, and work supports particular cultures and economies which may or may not overall benefit communities, people, and nature. 
To the contrary, 20th-century modern pop mass-education / modern national school systems (capitalism education) typically separates many subjects (language, math, science, art, culture, education, ecology, and economy) into separate indoor classrooms.  Capitalism education distracts students with disconnected subjects to keep students too distracted, too busy, and too helpless to help the community and its ecology and economy. Capitalism also distracts students with state standardized academic testing, sports, and ever newer electronic devices. Capitalism likes to be free to take away further power and wealth from communities, without people taking much notice. Capitalism education prevents students from learning how to be nice in all 5 ways. Capitalism education promotes competitive socializing, snobbery, and bullying. Many students compete to be wearing the trendiest clothes. Capitalism education is a cut-throat competition to get the highest test scores, to get into college, to make the most money, to do the most shopping, to support capitalism, to destroy life on this planet. Concurrently, capitalism distracts people with overwhelming amounts of information, trivia, fake news, and isolated bits of knowledge. Generally, in capitalism education, in science class, students do theoretical science that usually has nothing to do with art, economy, or the other subjects. Generally, in capitalism education, in culture class, students perhaps study the ancient Chinese culture, including its trendy styles of clothing and dance and food, but culture classes typically force students to do assignments that usually have nothing to do with how culture relates to the economy, education, nature, ecology, and other subjects. Generally, in capitalism education, in art class, students perhaps draw pictures and paint paintings, but art classes usually have students do art that was not usually related to what students are learning in science class, economy class, and other subjects. Generally, in capitalism education, in ecology, students learn about a food web in a habitat from somewhere in the world, but students did not usually learn how to run an ecological-friendly economy, or how to run a community government that supports the ecology and economy together, or how to live, learn, and work in ways that support habitats and end capitalism's vast worldwide ecological destruction. Generally, in capitalism education, students are trained to get hired into existing jobs that support capitalism (global market) and directly or indirectly harm communities.

Also see The Changes Needed in Education and the Economy: 7 Goals and Success Indicators of culture, education, ecology, and economy.

We want a holistically-good culture that helps communities, people, and nature. Thus, we want a community culture-education-ecology-economy. We want a community culture that educates children and adults to live, learn, work, and run an economy and government in ways that help people and nature to thrive together in a flourishing locally-self-sufficent community economy. We want a community culture of people doing holistic skills. We want a community culture that educates children and adults to live, learn, work, and run an economy and government in ways that help to defeat capitalism and its bad side-effects of numerous global chronic problems.

Eco. Ecology and economy are united. In fact, they have the same root word: "eco," which means "home" in the Greek language. Ecology is learning about our home in nature. Economy is taking good care of our home in nature. We need ecologists who talk about and help to run sustainable communities economies. We need economists who talk about and help to take care of nature. No one should ever be an economist, unless he first spends a few years working full time, in the dirt, doing ecology, stewarding the land, and growing a garden. If an economist doesn't mention about how to take care of nature, he is a lousy economist.

I love learning: especially learning how to sustain and enrich communities, people, and nature (including the environment). An education on how to sustain and enrich communities, people, and nature and an education on people-nature-economy linking together helps both people and nature to survive and thrive together. If people undergo an education that neglects nature, and people learn primarily about academics, sports, high-technology, how to make profits, and how to support capitalism, then communities, people, and nature languish together. I care about kids, but not so much about their report card grades and test scores, but about what really matters: can children grow up to take care of communities, people, nature, and the economy. I support holistic sustainable community education that helps communities, people, nature, and the economy thrive together. To promote community education, I teach nature classes via the Galien Valley Nature and Culture Program (2011-Present). To promote community education, I have done work in culture and education, including to write, author, and illustrate various children's books, textbooks, and essays on holistic sustainable education and culture: see the pocket pumpkin press (2006-Present) and Holistic.

Also see The Changes Needed in Education and the Economy: 7 Goals and Success Indicators of culture, education, ecology, and economy.

See Holistic Days for photos of holistic and sustainable activities.

See Zoe's Daily Blog for photos of holistic and sustainable activities in nature classes and see photos of Michigan nature.

See Galien Valley Nature and Culture Program for photos of holistic and sustainable activities in nature classes.

 

 

 

Examples of the
nicest societies,
holistic societies, and
community cultures

(community
culture-education-ecology-economy)

I can mention a few farming societies and hunter-gatherer societies that are nice (in all 5 ways), holistic, and has community cultures of community culture-education-ecology-economies. I don't know of any high-tech society that is nice (in all 5 ways), holistic, and has community cultures of community culture-education-ecology-economies, because none have existed yet that I know of (except maybe we can count the Amish, since some Amish families use smart phones). Keep in mind that it is not technology alone that helps people. The most help comes from morals, moral love, being nice in all 5 ways, holistic-good, and a community culture-education-ecology-economy. To focus on only technology (or only technology and money) is harmful to people and nature. Technology and money in moderation is better than technology and money in obsession.

Keep in mind that we should copy the best of past societies. We don't need to copy everything about any past society. We don't need to copy their rituals, religious details, or their style of clothing or art, but we should copy their values to cherish and help communities, people, and nature. We especially aim to copy and improve upon a society's morals, moral love (community-love, brotherly-love, a love to help all mankind), awareness, altruism, holistic good, helping people and nature thrive together. We should try to copy and improve upon a society's techniques on how its community economy takes care of both people and nature. We should try to copy and improve upon a society's techniques on how its community education teaches children to run an economy that takes good care of both people and nature.

The Hadza is a hunter-gatherer society. The Hadza live in Tanzania, Africa. They still live as a low-tech, stone-age, hunter-gatherer society today. Anthropologist Frank Marlowe wrote that the Hadza have lived a sustainable community culture, on their one same location in Tanzania, in for thousands of years. The Hadza have a community culture-education-ecology-economy: they raise and teach their children to run an economy (get all their stuff from nature) in ways that sustain both people and nature together. They teach their children how to handmake all their own stuff, from scratch, from local nature, in sustainable ways. To handmake everything takes a lot of time. Yet, the Hadza handmake all of their own stuff well-enough and fast-enough to meet all their needs. Marlowe also wrote that the Hadza treat Hadza men and women equally. The Hadza are peaceful and do not train for battle. The Hadza orally passes down several stories from thousands of years ago. Yet, they have no war stories, they haven't gone to war themselves, nor have they ever heard about the Hadza ever going to war. The Hadza don't fight with other tribes. The Hadza are generally healthy throughout life. Some Hadza live to be over 80 years old. The Hadza are poor, in that they don't have excess stuff, but the Hadza have everything that they need. The Hadza find enough food in the African savannah wilderness. No Hadza has ever known a Hadza to live in poverty (lack vital stuff) and starve to death. In fact, the Hadza help to feed the nearby agricultural people, during years of famines on their farms. Suggested book reading: Hadza: Hunter-Gatherers of Tanzania, by Frank Marlowe, 2010.

The Moriori was a hunter-gatherer society, from 1500 CE to 1800 CE, on the Chatham Islands, in the Pacific Ocean. The Moriori come from the Maori of the New Zealand mainland. The Maori were a farming society of several villages, in New Zealand. The villages often fought against each other. A group of Maori moved to the Chatham Islands, about 1500. That group became the Moriori. The Moriori hunter-gatherer society ended about 1800, upon the British and the Maori invading the Chatham Islands. Nevertheless, the Moriori started living on the the Chatham Islands, about 1500. The islands are very small. In order to survive on such small islands, the Moriori had to become hunter-gatherers and learned to live in peace with each other. They gave up farming and war, in order to survive. Not only did they survive, they thrived so much, that they castrate some male babies to prevent overpopulation. If you don't like castration, don't do it. The most important thing to learn from the Moriori is that they learned to live a sustainable lifestyle on the small islands. A community culture-education-ecology-economy is more important than population size. If a society does not have a sustainable community culture, no matter how small a society is, it will still be unsustainable. It would be great if, worldwide, people choose to give birth to fewer children, so that eventually the world people population would be less than 7 billion, and even less than 2 billion, but it's more important to establish sustainable community cultures. Suggested book reading: Guns, Germs, and Steel, by Jared Diamond, 1997.

Nauru Island, another tiny island, in the Pacific Ocean.  Let's look at one case study of what not to do: continue to use capitalism.  Let's look at what capitalism does at the microcosm example of the Island of Nauru.  Capitalism conquered Nauru.  Roughly the year 1900, capitalistic corporations started strip mining phosphate out of Nauru.  Nauru was mined for about 100 years.   In the 1900s, the people of Nauru were rolling in extravagant money.  They'd throw lavish parties, buy luxuries, and throw $1000s of dollar at babies.  By the year 2000, all the the phosphate had been extracted.  Nauru lost 80% of its land surface. Now, there is rampant poverty in Nauru.  There is no longer enough land for most people to farm there.  People are running for their lives away from Nauru, unless they are too poor to escape.  Today, Nauru is mostly destroyed.  This is what capitalism does: it's instant gratification: it makes some people rich in the short-run, as it slowly or quickly ruins the communities, people's lives, the land, and nature.  Eventually, the money runs out, and all that is left behind is the devastated communities, people, the land, and nature.  The Earth is much bigger than Nauru and the Chatham Islands (see the Moriori, previous paragraph), yet the Earth is finite.  How are we going to treat our own locality on Earth and the world at large?  Should we destroy them with capitalism, or should we enrich and sustain them somewhat like how the Moriori took care of the Chathams? Suggested book reading: This Changes Everything, by Naomi Klein, 2014.

The Apache was a hunter-gatherer society. The Apache lived as hunter-gatherers and with a community culture that was nice in all 5 ways, 150 years ago, in the southwestern USA and in Mexico. They lived in the deserts and learned to get enough food, even in the desert. Eventually, capitalism escorted USA's westward expansion and destroyed the community culture of the Apache and many other indigenous hunter-gatherer communities.  Likely, all of the remaining Apache have assimilated into modern society (the capitalist culture), by today.  Yet, an Apache native, Stalking Wolf, passed on some knowledge of how to live an Apache community culture, and how to take care of communities, people, and nature. He passed the knowledge on to Tom Brown Jr., who currently passes the knowledge onto people who read his books and attend his classes.  Tom wrote that Stalking Wolf said, “We [all mankind] are here on earth, to care for nature, not destroy it. [We] must take things from nature to live, that is a given fact, but it is the way that we take those things from nature and the end results, both immediate and in the future, that make us caretakers.” The Apache are famous for having remarkable warriors, such as Geronimo and Cochise. Yet also, the Apache have some just as remarkable peace activists and land caretakers, such as Stalking Wolf and Coyote Thunder. Suggested book reading: The Tracker, by Tom Brown Jr., 1978.

The Lakota was a hunter-gatherer society. The Lakota lived as hunter-gatherers and were nice in all 5 ways, 150 years ago, in the great plains and prairies of the USA.  Likely, all of the remaining Lakota have assimilated into modern society, by today.  Currently, many of them, who live on the reservations of South Dakota (such as at Pine Ridge), live in poverty.  Jobs are scarce. Another crucial type of poverty is the lack of meaningful purpose in life: the 5th way of being nice. The anguish of poverty leads them into gangs and alcoholism.  As hunter-gatherers, 150-years-ago, the Lakota were money-poor, but they had enough stuff (shelter, water, warmth, food, clothes, soap, and basic tools); plus, they had the meaningful purpose of being nice in all 5 ways, including to sustain and enrich communities, people, and nature.  Now, while living a city-life (civilized-life) on reservations, the Lakota are much worse off than while they were hunter-gatherers.  150 years ago, the Lakota ate enough, plus sustained the American Bison. They killed only a few bison, from which they got enough food, clothes, and skins for teepees. The Lakota did not kill as many bison as possible to sell as many as possible to make as much profit as possible. The Lakota was content with having enough stuff, not excess stuff. Meanwhile, the bison flourished for 100s of years while the Lakota lived in the Great Plains. As soon as capitalist American pioneers started to hunt the bison, the bison nearly went extinct in only 10 years. Capitalist hunters kill as many animals as possible to sell as many as possible to make as much profit as possible. 
150 years ago, Standing Bear enjoyed his childhood of living in the Lakota hunter-gatherer tribe of living a community culture that is nice in all 5 ways.  Also, Standing Bear was always adequately fed, quenched, clothed, warmed, cleaned, sheltered, and equipped with tools.  Additionally, during his early and middle childhood, while living with his tribe, Standing Bear was educated to live a community culture-education-ecology-economy that sustained and enriched communities, people, and nature.  As a teenager, he was sent away from his tribe to be taught how to read and write, at civilized schools. Suggested book reading: My Indian Boyhood, by Luther Standing Bear, 1931.

The Kogi (Tairona) is a farming-village society. They live in Colombia, South America. The Kogi are natives of South America. Today, they still live as a low-tech farming-village society, where they lived over 500 years ago; although, now, they live higher up in elevation, because civilization invaded into the lower elevations of their territory. The Kogi tend to a mosaic of wilderness and community farms. The farms are small, biodiverse, and organic. The Kogi have community cooperation between Kogi farming villages, a sustainable community economy, education, and society that has lasted for thousands of years.  The Kogi live a simple poor life, but they have everything they need: they eat enough food, etc. They are neither overworked, nor underworked. They enjoy life and laugh with each other. Several Kogi live to age 90 or more and are remarkably healthy, nimble, strong, and athletic, even at age 70. The Kogi are peaceful. At meeting houses, different Kogi villages often argue with each other, but there are no raids, battles, or wars. The Kogi don't have kings or bossy leaders or rich leaders, but they have humble "Mamas" who are moral and spiritual guides, as well as facilitators of the economy, ecology, farming, and walking paths, throughout the Kogi network of villages in the Colombian wilderness. Many Mamas are men, some Mamas are women.  The book and movie, mentioned below, show some things about the education of Mamas, and the general education of rest of the boys and girls.  The Kogi culture teaches all of its boys and girls how to run a sustainable economy, that sustains communities, people, and nature.  Also, all Kogi men suck on a dip stick coated with a burnt seashell powder, throughout the day, to remind them to take good care of women and nature. I guess it's to remind them that life will taste even more bitter if they don't take care of women and nature. While we don't necessary need to suck on burnt seashell powder, let's brainstorm on what else can we do to daily remind us to take good care of communities, people (both men and women), and nature, and support community cultures. The Kogi urgently beg modern civilization to stop hoping for or trying to find a technological fix to solve social, economic, and environmental problems, because there is no purely technological fix. The main fix is for modern society's "attitude" (culture-education-ecology-economy) to change to be more community-friendly and ecologically-friendly. The Kogi tells modern society what many of us don't yet emphasize: change our culture-education-ecology-economy. Also, the Kogi tells modern society what many modern people already emphasize that we need to do: stop deforestation, stop using fossil fuels, slow down the rate of further climate change, and stop digging for gold, coal, petroleum oil, etc. (Also, getting rid of state standardized academic testing is vastly important too. In general, everyone already hates state testing. It immensely cripples education. Communities should set their own standards. See educationz and Changes Needed in Education and Economy: 7 Goals and Success Indicators of culture, education, ecology, and economy, in order to help communities, people, and nature.) Yet, in order for modern society to stop deforestation, to stop using fossil fuels, to slow down further climate change, and to stop digging, modern society as a whole needs to change its culture-education-ecology-economy. Suggested book reading: The Elder Brother's Warning, by Alan Ereira of the BBC, 1990. Plus, there is a correlating documentary film called "From the Heart of the World," and a sequel film, called "Aluna."

The Amish is a farming-village society. There are many Amish communities that exist in the USA, today. Indeed, we should live more like the Amish, in that they have organic family farms, community cooperation, and live in moderation of material wealth and technology. If you don't like the Amish religion, don't follow the religion: just follow their sustainable aspects of living: organic family farms, community cooperation, being pacifists, and moderation of material wealth and technology. Some Amish use smart phones, but usually not cars, tvs, video games, zippers, etc.

More on past societies ...
Keep in mind
that many societies, of the distant past (before Medieval Feudal Europe), usually had enough supplies and stuff: shelter, clean water, warmth, food, clothes, soap, and basic tools. Many distant past societies were not rich (luxury and money, excess money), but they were not in poverty (lacking enough stuff) either. In many distant past societies, people had enough supplies and stuff, and no one starved to death. A lot of food comes from the wilderness and there was a lot of wilderness, in the past. Hunger and starvation was uncommon, especially for the hunter-gatherer. Famine did not remarkably happen until people relied on monoculture farms. Several societies were rich without money, in that they had things that were priceless: community, family, friends, as well as vast, pristine, vibrant, clean natural wildernesses. They were rich with community and nature. Some distant past societies experienced only peace, and never underwent raids, battles, and wars. Several distant past societies gave equal empowerment and respect to men and women. Many past small societies used democracy and had chief facilitators, not kings or tyrants. (Ancient Greece was the first civilization (city-society) that used democracy, but many small societies used democracy, before civilizations existed.) In several distant past small societies, people did not live a life of utter laziness and comforts; also, they did not live a hard knock life either. Hunter-gatherers worked less than farmers. On average, hunter-gatherers worked only 20 to 30 hours per week to hunt, gather, handmake, and maintain all their vital supplies (shelter, water, food, clothes, soap, and basic tools). Also, in some past distant societies, several people lived a long life of 80 or 100+ years. In all societies, people did science, people studied nature, especially hunter-gatherers. People cannot successfully hunt and gather unless they know about nature. "People have always been doing science" - Carl Sagan; although, modern science has a different focus than hunter-gatherer science. Hunter-gatherer science was naked-eye, hands-on, human-scale, low-tech science. Modern science focuses more on the microscopic, astronomical, and high-tech. In the past, there were thousands of small independent societies. Each one is different from all the other ones. Some societies were farming villages, others were hunter-gatherer tribal camps, and still others hunted, gathered, and gardened.  Compared to each other, each society ate different food, wore different clothing styles, wore different jewelry, made different art, ran different governments, celebrated different holidays, sang different songs, and told different stories, both non-fiction and fiction. Some tribes were only peaceful, and other tribes were a little violent or very violent. Some equally respected men and women, others respected women more, and still others respected men more. Some had many bizarre rituals and others hardly had any rituals at all. Tribes had different religions. Some tribes were monotheistic (e.g. Apache), other tribes were polytheistic (e.g. Hawaiian), and still other tribes were atheist (e.g. Hadza). The Apache, Hadza, Kogi, and the like did not have kings and did not have slaves. Many distant past societies were egalitarian, in which there was social and economic equality and justice. Elders had more power than children, but children grew up to become elders one day. In a community culture, economic differences are slight, and people become slightly richer and poorer than each other, day by day. For example, on one day, maybe person A had 10 arrowheads and person B had 9 arrowheads. But, by the next day, person A lost 2 arrowheads while hunting and person B had made another arrowhead: resulting in person A having 8 arrowheads and person B having 10 arrowheads. To the contrary, in capitalism, there is gigantic social and economic inequality and injustice: a few people are billionaires and most people never get close to being as equally rich or richer than them. In many past small societies of community cultures, people were not profit-oriented. People were content to have enough stuff. They did not try to accumulate excess money or as much money as possible, or as much stuff as possible. The point of life was to sustain and enrich communities and people's lives by taking care of nature and helping wildernesses to grow more vigorously. People saw the vast pristine vigorous wildernesses as wealth. To the contrary, in capitalism, stock brokers try to make as much excess money as possible; and meanwhile, they are oblivious to the wealth of wilderness. Money is pretend wealth; money it is whatever value we imagine that we give to it. Contrarily, the wilderness is the real bank of wealth. From the wilderness, we get our air, water, fertile soil, wood, and other natural materials, which we use as they are or make them into manmade products. Capitalism is based on fantasy, not reality. Whereas, a community culture-education-ecology-economy is based on reality.

Also see The Changes Needed in Education and the Economy: 7 Goals and Success Indicators of culture, education, ecology, and economy.

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