Blog of Zoe at Galien Valley
Galien River valley, southwest Michigan, North America

5 butterflies, Michigan, 7 goals success education economy

more on CEEE:
Culture, Education, Ecology, Economy

Community Education is
Eco-Education: Ecologic and Economic

The Changes Needed in
Education and the Economy:

7 goals and success indicators
in culture,
education, ecology, and economy

7 goals and success indicators in
Culture, Education, Ecology, and Economy:
1. Community Standards for Schools.
Get rid of state standardized testing.
2. Community Jobs. Schools train students for jobs and get jobs for students.
3. Diminish Poverty.
4. Local-Self-Sufficiency.
5. Natural Resources.
6. Eco-Jobs: Ecologic and Economic.
7. Reduce Using Fossil Fuels.

To sustain and enrich communities, people, and nature, we’ve got to form sustainable community economies and sustainable community educations. The first step is to be moral, morals-love-awareness-health; to be moral is always first.  But, after starting to acquire morals-love-awareness-health, the next first step is to study the CEEE: culture-education-ecology-economy, get communities to set their own sustainable education and academic standards, and get rid of federal and state standardized academic testing. High school SAT and ACT tests for college entrance can stay, but get rid of the all the state testing.  Let communities and school districts decide their own goals and standards. 

See definition of community.

Change. We want change for the better, and not change for the worse.  Also, we want to have all our needs met while we change.  We want change that improves our lives, not change that puts us into poverty. Sustainable change is change that helps communities be more sustainable and have better community cooperation.  Sustainable change helps us to meet everyone’s needs now, and into the future.  Sometimes, people fear change, because they think it may put them into poverty.  They worry that change may take away good things that they have.  Yet, sustainable change is about getting people out of poverty.  Sustainable change helps us to meet everyone’s needs now, and into the future.  Yes, during sustainable change, people might lose some things, but only to gain better things.  Sustainable change helps communities to function better, so that people within a community can all support each other during changes. Change happens all the time anyway, whether we make changes or not. Thus, we might as well make changes for the better (make sustainable change) instead of just letting changes for the worse happen. Let's make sustainable changes in our culture, education, ecology, and economy.

We all need an education, but not just any education. We all need a sustainable education (a. k. a. community education, community arts education, and eco-education) that relates to a sustainable community economy.  The kids, who have trouble with academics, have trouble with academics commonly because academics are taught in a way that has little to directly do with their life and family economy.  A good education, a sustainable education, a community education is not about academics, but it’s about the community, economy (family economy and community economy), and nature, and the academics that go with it.  The point of an education is to be wise and skilled enough to make ends meet to get enough vital supplies and stuff (shelter, water, warmth, food, clothes, soap, and basic tools) in ways that sustain and enrich people and nature within communities.  The point of an education is to promote 7 priceless things (morals-love-awareness-health, one’s sustainable skills, nature, people, the community economy, community landscape, and community culture, see 7 priceless things in sustainable) as well as getting everyone vital basic stuff.  An academic education is stupid and useless, if it leaves many people unemployed, underemployed, and in poverty, lacking vital supplies and stuff.  Because of the modern pop schooling of 20th-century style schools of academic educations, many high school and college graduates live in poverty (lack vital basic stuff), today, in the USA and worldwide.   

People need a community education, not an academic education.  Once you get students hooked on the community, that will inspire them to read to help the community.  Some kids will read if you just make them.  Other kids will read only if it relates to the real world, real life, and to their family economy and community economy.   A community education will get more people to read.  Yet, if you can read, but you can’t get a job, what’s the point of reading?   Therefore, more importantly than inspiring more kids to read, a community education should help students get jobs with local small businesses (including local small industries and cottage industries) or help students to set up their own local small businesses.   If graduates lack worthy community jobs and are unable to economically support themselves, that largely means that the world economy, type of school, and educational emphasis are failures, and not it's not usually or largely the graduates’ failures. Community education helps students and graduates to get worthy community jobs and to economically support themselves.

A community education helps people with both academics and economics. Some kids will read just for the sake of reading. Yet, more kids will be inspired to read if reading helps the community. Kids love to help. Therefore, if reading helps the community, kids will more likely read to read useful information to help the community. A community education helps the economy by having the school help students and graduates get worthy jobs at local small businesses. A community education helps people with both academics and economics.  

In addition to boosting academic and economic achievements, a community education boosts the community's ecology too. A community education teaches students how to steward local habitats, to grow organic food, and to manage local resources. A community education teaches students how to run a community economy and do business at local small businesses in ways that help both people and nature. A community education (community arts education) is a sustainable education and eco-education: ecologic and economic. A community education helps to sustain and enrich the community landscape and its ecology, nature, air, water, land, soil, habitats, native wildlife, and environment. A community education boosts education, ecology, and the economy all together.

We all know that we need to stop using fossil fuels to help reduce further climate change.  Also, we all know that we’re having a hard time reducing our use of fossil fuels.  I don’t hear enough people discuss changing our culture, economy, and education to get off fossil fuels. We’re not likely going to get our economy off of fossil fuels unless we also get education off of fossil fuels.  A priority in education should be to retrain fossil fuels industry employees as well as to teach our children how to grow food and to build communities, lifestyles, and technologies that don’t use fossil fuels. 

Sustainability is mostly about our culture, education, ecology, and the economy. Sustainability is not just about technology and money. There is no purely technological and financial fix. Technology and money can help.  But, mostly, sustainability is about our culture, education, ecology, and the economy.  We have to change our attitudes, as in change our attitudes, values, and views of culture, education, ecology, and ecology economy to be more community-oriented, instead of greed-oriented.   We’ve got to change our culture-education-ecology-economy.   Ecology includes the global environment and how people engage with local nature.   Economy includes how people and businesses use natural resources, water, soil, wood, sunlight, energy, etc.  Culture includes values.  Culture sets our economic values, education values, how we value nature, how we engage with nature, and how sustainable we should be.  We need a sustainable culture that has sustainable values for both education and the economy.  A “community culture-education-ecology-economy,” or “community culture” for short, is a sustainable culture-education-ecology-economy, C-triple-E. (Read more about CEEE.) 

We have to change our cultural values in order to help people be wise, help people out of poverty and make their ends meet, help people get jobs with local small businesses, and help the environment and reduce our use of fossil fuels. Modern culture currently overvalues the growth of globalized corporations and copious profits as well as obsesses over state standardized testing and impractical college degrees. Modern culture's values hinder education, spread poverty, and harm the environment. We have to change our cultural values of education values, ecologic values, and economic values to more strongly support sustaining and enriching communities, people, and nature.

Culture, education, ecology (including how humans interact with nature and steward nature), and economy are strongly linked together and influence each other. We cannot change one alone; therefore, we have to change all of them together. We have to change our cultural values of education values, ecologic values, and economic values together, not separately. We have to change our cultural, educational, ecologic, and economic main goals and success indicators. Furthermore, our main goals and success indicators have to be exactly the same in our culture, education, ecology, and economy. If they are not the same, they all hinder each other from reaching their different goals. The only way to sustain and enrich communities, people, and nature is if our culture, education, ecology, and economy have the same sustainable goals and success indicators.

The most sustainable action people can take right now is to end state standardized testing in education.  Let communities set their own sustainable community education standards, along the lines of the following 7 goals.  It’s up to each community to decide what is best for its people and nature, but every community should seriously discuss these 7 goals.  Also, there can be more than 7 goals, but each community and school district should probably focus on these 7 goals first.  Or maybe the 7 goals are too much at first.  So perhaps some communities will do only 3 goals first: get rid of state standardized testing, get school teachers, staff, and students help to grow and distribute organic food to everyone in the community, and have the community overall reduce using fossil fuels.   You’ll notice that academics is not one of the top 7 goals, but academics can be taught in correlation to these 7 goals.  For instance, instead of reading a novel about unicorns being happy or sad, students can read about how to take care of communities, people, and nature. Students should read about how to run sustainable community economies and work at sustainable local small businesses. Perhaps students can read a novel that includes factual sustainable information mixed into the story, about how people and unicorns worked together to run a community economy and protect nature, etc.  Let’s be creative, but let’s do it in useful, helpful, and sustainable ways.  Meanwhile, maybe we put a pause on student report cards of academics to instead have students report cards of community participation. Perhaps most of a school day should be about community, food, landcare, and reducing the usage of fossil fuels - and meanwhile, throughout the day, students are pulled aside for 40 minutes for one-on-one time with mentors (25 minutes for reading, 15 minutes for math). The 7 goals and success indicators are the following.

7 goals and success indicators in
Culture, Education, Ecology, and Economy:

black swallowtail butterfly, 7 goals, success, culture, education, ecology, economy

1. Community Standards for Schools. Did the community and school district stop doing state standardized testing? Did the community and school board set up its own standards for sustainable education and academics? Did the community review the 40 ways to sustain communities, people, and nature (www.z-hub.org/zle-blog/sustain.html)? Did the community set up sustainable goals in its culture, education, ecology, and economy?

buckeye butterfly, 7 goals, success, culture, education, ecology, economy

2. Community Jobs. Schools Train Students for Jobs and Get Jobs for Students. Did the community and community school get all school graduates working in the community's local small businesses and or starting up local small businesses (including small industries and cottage industries)? Do students (age 12+) work part time at local jobs (but not only at restaurants)? How do science and art classes and other classes relate to sustainable community jobs?

giant swallowtail butterfly, Michigan, 7 goals, success, culture, education, ecology, economy

3. Diminish Poverty. Can the community adequately employ all of its young adults (age 20s, 30s) and older adults? Do most or all adults work at small local businesses or cottage industries? Do all adults, who have a family to support, earn a big-enough living wage to support a family? Does everyone, who needs a full time job, have a full time job? Did the community get everyone out of poverty, in that, in the community, everyone has enough vital basic stuff (housing in good repair, clean air, clean water, local organic food, clothes, soap, warmth, basic tools, and sanitary living conditions)?

morning cloak butterfly, Michigan, 7 goals, success, culture, education, ecology, economy

4. Local-Self-Sufficiency. How locally-self-sufficient is the community economy? Does everyone in the community eat local organic food? Does everyone eat enough organic nutritious food? Is the community increasingly relying on more locally-sourced and locally-made stuff: water, food, clothes, linens, soap, tools, furniture, toys, paper, books, posters, art, music, energy, etc.? Are students learning how to handmake many of their own stuff: growing food, cooking food, building eco-houses, sewing clothes, making pottery, woodworking, homesteading, setting up renewable energy generators for residences, starting a local small business, etc? Do science and art classes, and other classes relate to helping the community be locally-self-sufficient?

Monarch Butterfly, Michigan, 7 goals, success, culture, education, ecology, economy

5. Natural Resources. How well is the community taking care of nature and managing its natural resources? Does the school get students to help to steward local habitats, to grow organic food, and to manage local resources? In dry regions, each community should decide whether or not to try Holistic Planned Grazing in its community, to help to reverse desertification.

silver spotted skipper butterfly, Michigan, 7 goals, success, culture, education, ecology, economy

6. Eco-Jobs: Ecologic and Economic. How well are businesses and jobs meeting both human needs and ecological needs? Does the school teach students job skills to work at jobs that help both people and nature?

tiger swallowtail butterfly, Michigan, 7 goals, success, culture, education, ecology, economy

7. Reduce Using Fossil Fuels. How much has the community reduced using fossil fuels? What has it done to reduce using fossil fuels?

 

Global Cooperation, not Global Competition. Implementing these goals should not be a competition between nations, states, communities, and school districts.  We need global cooperation, not global competition.  It’s in every nation’s best interest to support all other nations in being sustainable.  We should increase our exchange of love, peace, and sustainable ideas, and decrease our exchange of money, products, and resources.

Economic Self-Sufficiency. Think Global, Act Local:
Global Love, Local Economics.  People should travel the world to spread love, joy, peace, and exchange sustainable ideas, but people should not travel the world to do business, invest money, trade, or import resources. The global market makes a few people very rich, and many communities and many people very poor. It’s best that wealth stays and grows in each community and more evenly spreads throughout its many people, for the sake of social and economic justice. Yes, tourists can buy a few souvenirs, that were locally-made at the places they visit. Yes, distant communities and nations can help each other, but temporarily. 50 years of foreign aid going to Africa and getting Africa into the global market has generally been global coercion and global helpless dependency, not global cooperation. A person, who can walk and talk and earn a living for oneself, can better interact with the world than a helpless person, who has someone else talking for him and moving him around and constantly having to tend to him. Likewise, a community, which runs a locally-self-sufficient community economy for itself, can better interact with the world
.

See Holistic Days for photos of holistic and sustainable activities.

See Zoe's Daily Blog for photos of holistic and sustainable activities in nature classes and see photos of Michigan nature.

See Galien Valley Nature and Culture Program for photos of holistic and sustainable activities in nature classes.

To paraphrase: we need to change our cultural values to reduce our use of fossil fuels as well as to diminish several interconnected chronic global disasters, such as poverty, pollution, excessive garbage, social and economic injustice, and more. (Read more about it in CEEE.) We need to change our cultural values, including what are the important goals and indicators of success in education, in ecology, and in the economy.  Our goals and success indicators should be the same in our culture, education, ecology, and economy: have locally-self-sufficient communities.

Many modern people cling to the current economy and modern pop schooling, as if getting rid of them would be a disaster.  Yet, the current economy and modern pop schooling are worsening many current chronic global disasters (and local disasters), and keeping us on fossil fuels.  We need to let go of the present economy and modern pop schooling to decrease the disasters and our addiction to fossil fuel.  Also, we need to change the economy and modern pop schooling if we are really going to be a more sustainable, more friendly and harmonious, and a more peaceful, healthy, wise, and caring society.   The 7 main goals and success indictors of education, ecologic, and economic success are mentioned above.

Education Success Signs. For education values, we should change signs of success from academic test scores to getting students into jobs with a local small business. 
Inaccurate Education Success Signs: state academic test scores and college degrees
Accurate Education Success Signs: most graduates have jobs at local small businesses in their hometown community, and the other graduates have jobs at local small businesses in other communities.
We should set up co-op programs (part-academics-that-relate-to-work, and part-working), perhaps for students as young as age 12.  Really, the success of an education is (60%) how well the community and school are doing to get students into local jobs and (40%) how well the student does ((20%) at the job, and (20%) academics related to the job).  In the community economy, communities need to start making jobs for students (age 12+) and helping students to start up these jobs themselves with adult guidance. Community jobs should be related to what is very important to communities, people, and nature: get everyone in the community out of poverty and to have enough vital supplies and stuff: housing, water, food, warmth, clothes, soap, basic tools, and local energy. When school districts first start this program, for the first 2 or 3 years, the first jobs for all students (age 12-18) could be growing and distributing local food to everyone in the community, so everyone eats enough food. Or start with getting local organic food to everyone within a half-mile radius of the school. Or start with getting local organic food to every student family. Maybe school should become year-round. The school year might still be only 180 days, but include many school days within the growing season.

In addition to part-time food jobs, at school, students should study 6 subjects: moral health, nature science, nature art (economy), permaculture food (economy), landcare (ecology), and community culture. Reading, writing, and math can interrelate to those subjects. The six subjects are described at Holistic Education. These six subjects should relate to community jobs of service work and productive work. Service work includes moral health, nature science, and community culture. Productive work includes nature art, making stuff, permaculture food, and landcare.

After the first 2 or 3 years of focusing on part time local food jobs for students, the following school years may include students having part time jobs that vary widely and especially include: organic family farms, permaculture food, community gardens, cooking, baking, carpentry (to repair and build housing), passive houses, cob houses, strawbale houses, plumbing, community system water management, hand-pump water wells, composting toilets, local energy, solar panels, residential vertical wind turbines, geothermal heating and cooling, sewing and alterations, local clothing, sheep and alpaca farms (for wool), soap making, local nature and ecology, local banking and credit unions, local insurance, local media company, local paper, local books, local periodicals and news, local government, local parks, local community education, iron-tool-making, machined tools, nursing, medicines (modern, herbal, and alternatives), etc.  The skills and jobs, that students do in part time while being students, should commonly be what the students do for a living beyond high school graduation.  Of course, students (age 12 to 18) could try 3 or 4 different jobs.  Maybe at age 15, they spend 1-year sampling 10 different jobs. Get each student out doing a variety of jobs, at a variety of businesses, during the 6 years of 7th to 12th grade.  Get students the jobs that make, fix, build, and grow things for the community.  Don’t give them jobs of only cleaning, restaurants, retail, and cashiering.  Also, have students try different job positions within one business.  We want communities of people who are skilled to make, fix, build, and grow things, and not communities of people who only clean things, sell stuff, serve food, and drive stuff around. At age 17, each student should pick one job and learn how to do it well in the school-job co-op for a year or two, and then do that job as an adult full time for the next 5 years, or for the next 10 or 30 years.  Community education should help the community as well as the students.  Community education should help to create small local businesses and jobs.  Some people move away, that’s natural.  But something is bad about the culture, education, ecology, and economy if most young adults (ages 20s, 30s) move away from a community to find jobs elsewhere, due to a lack of local jobs.  Also, something is bad about the culture, education, ecology, and economy if most young adults work tedious jobs with very monotonous tasks, such as while working at fast food restaurants, at national chain stores, while driving trucks all over the USA to distribute imported goods, or just cleaning other people's messes. A good culture, education, ecology, and economy has each adult do a satisfying and clever job of a variety of tasks, including to grow food, to steward the land, to clean-up one's own mess, to make stuff, and to locally sell and distribute local stuff.

Economic Success Signs. For economic values, we should change the signs of economic success from the exchanges of money, corporate profits, the GNP, and the GDP to how well a nation’s communities can employee young adults in their 20s and 30s, and adults of age 40 and older.   
Inaccurate Economic Success Signs: exchanges of money, corporate profits, the GNP, the GDP, the global stock market, etc.
Accurate Economic Success Signs: How well a nation’s communities can employee young adults in their 20s and 30s, and working-age adults of age 40 and older? Do all full-time working adults earn a living wage? Is everyone out of poverty, in that everyone has enough supplies and stuff (clean air, clean water, organic local food, housing in good repair, clothes, soap, basic tools, and sanitary living conditions)?
Most young adults and (non-retired) older adults should not be unemployed, underemployed, or overworked.  A second sign of economic success should be: how economically self-sufficient are communities? How much of its own food can a community raise and grow within 10 miles of the community?  A third sign of economic success is: how much natural habitat are communities stewarding and restoring?  How clean is the air, surface water, and ground water in a community?  How fertile are its soils?  How are the jobs and local small businesses operating in a ways that sustain and enrich both people and nature?  A fourth sign of economic success is how much has a community reduced using fossil fuels?  Is it putting up solar panels, or what are its new local sources of energy?   

Community Jobs. Each person's job should include a variety of tasks within a business. Each job should relate to 1 or more of 4 things: local family-farmed organic food, ecological landcare, productivity, and service. At large, people should have productive jobs that make, fix, build, and grow things in the community. Productive jobs include, but are not limited to, farming, landcare, building and repairing houses, making and installing solar panels, making clothes, altering clothes, fixing cars, fixing things, making soap, and making tools. In a productive job, significant time should be spent on making, fixing, building, and growing things, and some time for cleaning, and may be some time for managing, selling, cashiering, and or driving. Every job should include at least one task of production. No job should be only service. No job should be only cleaning, only cashiering and sales and stocking, only driving and deliveries, only restaurant tasks, only manual labor, and only management. Restaurant employees should not only wait tables, bus tables, wash dishes, prepare food, and or be a cashier, but also, all restaurant employees should have tasks to grow, harvest, preserve, and store food. Restaurants can get food from local farms, but restaurants should grow some of their own food too. Retail employees and cashiers should not only sell stuff, but also they should be making some of the stuff that they sell. Drivers and deliverers should be making some of the stuff that they deliver. We want communities of people who are skilled to make, fix, build, and grow things, and not communities of people who only clean things, sell stuff, serve food, and drive stuff around. A good culture, education, ecology, and economy has each adult do a satisfying and clever job of a variety of tasks, including to grow food, to steward the land, to clean-up one's own mess, to make stuff, and to locally sell and distribute local stuff.

The point of work for adults and kids isn’t maximum production and increasing the quantity of produced items each year, but it’s to produce enough items, to help everyone learn how to make items, and to also sustain and enrich priceless things.  Priceless things include morals, unselfish and sustainably-skilled people, the well-being of nature (air, water, soil, wildlife, habitats, etc.), kinships, friendships, community cohesion and cooperation, community landscape, community culture, and a locally-self-sufficient community economy.  The major points of living, learning, and working for adults and kids isn’t for maximum profits and increasing profits, but the major points of living, learning, and working is to do so morally and sustainably, to have everyone in the community to be supplied with enough necessary items (shelter, water, food, etc.), and to have priceless things.

Many modern Americans and college graduates don't want to be full-time farm workers, doing full-time heavy-manual-labor. Yet, every able-bodied young adult (under age 50) should be doing at least some part-time light-manual-labor of farming and or landcare. No type of profession, social or economic status, IQ, or number of college degrees exempts able-bodied young adults from part-time farming, gardening, landcare, and productivity - making, fixing, building, and growing things. Many community jobs should include a mix of tasks: part-time service work and part-time productive work. Service work includes, but is not limited to, cleaning, retail, serving food, driving, medical care, lawyer services, accounting, education, science, professional entertainment, and professional sports. Young doctors, lawyers, politicians, scientists, computer technicians, engineers, librarians, athletes, musicians, military personnel, etc. should all do some part-time light-manual-labor outdoor productive work: farming and landcare.

In summary, the signs of cultural, education, ecologic, and economic success should be the same.  Signs of education, ecological, and economic success within a nation include: can its communities employ its young adults and older adults within local small businesses, how locally-self-sufficient are its communities, how well are its communities taking care of nature, and how much have its communities reduced using fossil fuels?   Signs of education, ecological, and economic success within a community include: can it employ its young adults and older adults, how locally-self-sufficient is it, how well is it taking care of nature, and how much has it reduced using fossil fuels?   The signs and goals of education, ecological, and economic success have to be the same in order to reduce our use of fossil fuels, mitigate the increasing rate of climate change, and diminish many other chronic global problems including poverty, pollution, and social and economic injustice and inequality. 

Parents shouldn’t be asking their kids what grades they got on their academic report cards.  Parents should be asking their kids and the school board and the community: what do students do at school to improve community local-self-sufficiency, overcome community poverty, take care of the land and nature, and help us to stop using fossil fuels?  Just sitting around reading Shakespeare is immoral, unethical, complacent, and irresponsible, while communities, people, and nature need our help.  The irony is that, through community education, we might even end up reading more Shakespeare than we are now. 

USA modern pop schooling of 20th-century style schools of academic education is not a failure because of low academic test scores.  USA modern pop schooling of 20th-century style schools of academic education is a failure because it does not help the ecology and economy of communities. It doesn't help students learn how to grow wealth within their communities, to start up local small businesses, to diminish poverty in their community, to have students develop sustainable interrelationships with local nature, and to reduce using fossil fuels. USA modern pop schooling of 20th-century style schools of academic education is a failure because education, ecology, and economic values are not united to sustain people and nature together in communities.
USA modern pop schooling of 20th-century style schools of academic education mainly distracts students with obsessions of academics, sports, and high-technology while fossil fuel usage increases, the gap between the rich and poor grows, and poverty increases as the global market and globalized large corporations increasingly take away wealth from communities, people, and nature. (Read more about it in CEEE.)  

To paraphrase: we need to change our cultural values to reduce our use of fossil fuels as well as to diminish several interconnected chronic global disasters, such as poverty, pollution, excessive garbage, social and economic injustice, and more. (Read more about it in CEEE.)  We need to change our cultural values, including what are the important goals and indicators of success in education, in ecology, and in the economy.  Our goals and success indicators should be the same in our culture, education, ecology, and economy: have locally-self-sufficient communities.

The federal, state, and county governments should make policies, initiatives, and incentives for community self-sufficiency. Each community government, together with its community school board, should develop a master plan for its community self-sufficiency. Current large corporations should invest in community self-sufficiency and local small businesses. Gradually, large corporations should break up into those small businesses. Communities will make sure everyone, including former people of big business, are taken care of well-enough. Community self-sufficiency aims to do good to everybody. The few business people, who currently earn huge salaries, may make smaller salaries, but no one is going to go into poverty. The very rich can retire or be retrained to adapt to community jobs. Meanwhile, community self-sufficiency aims to keep and get everyone out of poverty. In a community culture-education-ecology-economy, in general, everyone is going to at least have enough supplies and stuff (clean air, clean water, local organic food, housing in good repair, clothes, soap, basic tools, and sanitary living conditions), and the communities will put every working-age adult to work at something useful to the community. No working-age adult is going to be unemployed. Everyone, who needs a full-time job, gets a full-time job. Plus, every adult, who works full time, earns a living wage.

See definition of community.

See CEEE: culture-education-ecology-economy.

See Holistic Education.

See Holistic Design of outdoor learning spaces of holistic education.

See Holistic Sustainability.

See Holistic Days for photos of holistic and sustainable activities.

See Zoe's Daily Blog for photos of holistic and sustainable activities in nature classes and see photos of Michigan nature.

See Galien Valley Nature and Culture Program for photos of holistic and sustainable activities in nature classes.

 

 

© 2019 Pocket Pumpkin Press, last updated Janaury 2019
Three Oaks, Michigan, USA