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government, freedom, sharing, protecting

1. GOVERNMENT. A government allows people amounts of freedom and makes, enforces, and interprets laws.  Generally, the fewer laws there are and the milder they are, the more freedom there is.  Generally, the more laws there are and the more severe they are, the more oppression there is, and the less freedom there is. 

2. Overview of conditions that affect government. The amounts of freedom and oppression that a government establishes over a society depend on numerous social elements and environmental elements.  The greatest amount of freedom most likely happens while the social elements and environmental elements are optimal.  Social elements are optimal while there are well-functioning family and deep friendships; most people have a healthy daily routine; the economy is healthy (there is adequate food, clothing, shelter, tools, art for everyone); most people have a useful and hands-on education (learn to be capable and sustainable, discover connections); most people engage in art and creativity; and most people have morals and spiritual qualities (kindness, honesty, courage, etc.) and practical values.  Such optimal environmental elements include clean drinking water; unpolluted air to breathe; the fertility of soil and the vigor of habitats to provide people with natural resources for food, clothes, shelter, tools, and art); and the vigor of habitats to supply people with serenity, excitement, inspiration, and a deep culture.  Everything is connected to everything; thus, the most amount of freedom likely occurs while everything is optimal, when all social elements and all environmental elements are optimal. 

3. FREEDOM. Various examples of doing things and experiencing things during optimal freedom. While a government is allowing the most amount of freedom, each person is free.  For instance, each person is free to assist in shaping a culture that tries to help all social elements and environmental elements.  Each person is free to spend the day with his or her loved ones (family and dear friends).  Grandparents, parents, and children are free to spend the day together at their home and in the local outdoors.  Each person is free to develop and uphold a healthy daily routine of adequate exercise, play, and rest.  Each person is free to get a great education and to play and connect with the local outdoors.  Each person is free to choose practical values.  Each person is free to be self-sufficient and to make his or her own necessities (food, clothes, shelter, and tools).  Each person is free to be creative and to make his or her own art.  Each person is free to live in the wilderness for free, without owning property.  While there is freedom, the land is free.  Each person is free to harvest local natural resources for supplies (food, clothes, shelter, tools, and art).   Each person is free to use, protect, sustain, and celebrate local natural resources.   Each person is free from money, shopping, corporations, and factories.  People don’t need to buy supplies, because they can locally get natural materials and make their own supplies for free.   Each person is free from professional jobs, because no one needs money.  Freedom entails responsibility; thus, each person (or family or local small society) is responsible for self-sufficiently getting materials from the local outdoors and making necessities.  Within the most amount of freedom, each local society is free from a distant and or centralized governing power.  Each local society is free to rule itself.   The government of each local society is free to allow each family to be autonomous.  The government of each local society is often headed by a chief whom acts as a facilitator, not a boss.  The chief rules just enough to prevent chaos, but otherwise his job is largely to let freedom flourish.  The chief promotes freedom for the local society and for each person in the local society.  The chief is usually one of the most selfless people in the local society.  The chief thrives off of giving power away to empower each person; thus, the local people greatly respect the chief because the chief is so selfless.  Freedom empowers each person and benevolently influences each person to be responsible and capable.  Abraham Lincoln said, “Freedom is not the right to do what we want, but what we ought.”  “Freedom is not the right to do what we want [extravagant obsessions (such as perfectly-manicured lawns, humongous houses, awards and trophies, fame, ownership of lots of stuff)], but what we ought [what is sustainable and healthy for each person].”   Each person ought to have healthy daily routines of getting enough exercise, rest, and play.  Each person ought to be able to independently acquire his or her nutritious food and adequate humble clothes, shelter, tools, and art without paying money.  Each person ought to usually spend the whole day together with his or her family and best friends at home and in the local outdoors.  Each person ought to have intact kinships and deep friendships.  Each person ought to have a great education that connects him or her to his or her local society of family & friends and to the local outdoors.  Each person ought to learn to share and have sharing be a vital, sustainable, practical value.  Each person ought to share and protect the local natural resources with the local society and local wildlife.  Each person ought to help sustain and celebrate his or her local society, family, friends, local land, and local habitats.  Each person ought to have an active, creative, inspiring, exciting & calming, fun, satisfying, artistic life.  Each person ought to be economically equal to everyone else; everyone should be adequately prosperous; there should not be excessively-rich people and needy people.  Each person ought to have practical values, have morals, and express spiritual qualities (kindness, caring, honesty, courage, selflessness, etc.).  Each person ought to be autonomous.  In the most amount of freedom, each person is free to do what he or she ought to do.  While all social and natural elements are free, the government is sustaining the most amount of freedom for each person.  Everything is connected to everything; thus, government and freedom are related to all social elements (health, economy, school, art, values, etc.), culture, and all natural elements (habitats, plants, animals, water, ground, air, etc.).

4. OPPRESSION. Various examples of doing things and experiencing things during oppression. Likely, the government is extremely oppressive if all the elements are in dire conditions; for instance if: grandparents, parents, and children are separated from each other for the bulk of most days; families spend a lot of time away from home each day; most daily schedules are too hectic; most professional jobs are boring; the extreme divisions of labor make most careers too narrow; school generally gives wasteful tedious busywork; standardized test scores are worshipped; many people spend too much time in tiny, mind-numbing, depressing, indoor spaces; many people lack enough freedom to have the time to do enough exercising, being outdoors, relaxing, and resting; many people lack enough time to have deep friendships; many people lack enough time to prepare food in a nutritious way; many people lack enough time to adequately engage in art;  intelligence is reduced to fragmented trivia; fame, money, greed, career, vain fashions, reckless parties, and shopping become more important than kinship, friendships, health, spiritual qualities, sharing, and sustainability; there is economic inequity, a few people are very rich and many people are poor; the drinking water has toxic chemicals, the air is polluted, habitats are destroyed, and natural resources are depleted so that there is not enough for food, clothes, shelter, and tools.   The water and air are getting polluted and the ecosystems and natural resources are being depleted in part because local societies have lost their freedom to have the power to protect water, air, ecosystems, and natural resources.  When local societies lose their freedom all social elements and all natural elements deteriorate.  Everything is connected to everything; thus, if governments are oppressive, likely many elements are in poor condition as well.  If many elements are in poor condition, it’s logical that governments are oppressive.  If many things are dire: deep friendships are lacking, education is fragmented and useless, culture is shallow, food lacks nutrition, the daily routine is hectic and boring, water and air is polluted, there’s famine, biodiversity decreases, and habitats are destroyed, it’s no wonder that freedom is deficient.  Everything is connected; it’s no wonder that societies around the globe have oppressive governments. 

5. INCREASING FREEDOM. Various examples of doing things and experiencing things that will likely increase freedom. If oppression is rampant, increasing freedom has a lot to do with improving all the social and environmental elements.  Freedom and autonomy will likely increase, for instance: as habitats and ecosystems flourish again; as biodiversity increases; as soil organically becomes more fertile; as water and air become less polluted; as people spend more time connecting with the natural outdoors for wisdom, inspiration, excitement, and relaxation; as people learn how to make a broad range of necessities (food, clothes, shelter, tools, art) for themselves; as local societies make their own necessities; as each family makes their own food in a nutritious way; as kinship and friendships deepen; as education becomes more practical and focuses less on trivial things; as the daily routine becomes less hectic; and as grandparents, parents, and children spend more time together at their home and in the local outdoors.

Everything is connected to everything; thus, government and freedom are related to all social elements (health, economy, school, art, values, etc.), culture, and all natural elements (habitats, plants, animals, water, ground, air, etc.).

Links:

Southwest Michigan's Sustainable Pursuits
In Southwest Michigan, various examples of how people are trying to improve social and environmental conditions to provide people and society with more freedoms.

Additional Sustainable Pursuits
Various examples of how people of Michigan, USA, and beyond are currently taking action to enrich and sustain nature and society and to increase people's and society's freedom.

A Great Life, Great Culture
Explores a lifestyle and culture that supports the greatest amount of freedom.

Questions about Civilization and Uncivilization
Explores freedom and oppresion in civilization and uncivilization.

Nature Connections
Explores many natural resources and habitats that people and society use and enjoy. People need freedom to have the freedom to connect with, enrich, celebrate, sustain, and protect natural resources, habitats, and ecosystems.

100% Totally Sustainable
What it takes to have the optimal conditions in society and nature for people to have the greatest amount of freedom.

Imagine a School
A School of Liberty. A school at which each student learns how to do activities that increase and sustain the liberty for himself or herself and society. A sustainable school. A school in which children learn about their connections to social elements and natural elements; and children learn how to be a benefit to society and nature and to enrich and sustain society and nature. 40 ways a school can be a benefit to children, society, and nature.

Sustainable Design Expands Freedom:

z-design
A landscape architecture firm in Three Oaks, in Southwest Michigan. The firm’s mission includes designing each landscape with multiple purposes: each landscape to be beneficial to society and nature and to be beneficial, beautiful and enticing, useful, and engaging to the people who use it. Also, the firm’s mission includes helping to expand people’s freedom by designing landscapes in which people can live more independently from money by growing and developing resources on-site, gathering and making necessary supplies, and living more self-sufficiently and sustainably.

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